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The Absolute Best Low Carb Mandarin Pancakes for Moo Shu

I have always loved the Chinese dish Moo Shu. However, once I adopted the low carb gluten and grain free lifestyle, Moo Shu was off the menu since it was made with sugary sauce and served with gluten wrappers. Of course, I could substitute the traditional Mandarin pancake wrapper with lettuce, but it was always less than satisfactory.

This low carb Mandarin pancakes recipe I developed is not only simple, but it captures the reminiscent flavors and textures of the gluten filled original that I missed. In addition to this recipe for low carb Mandarin pancakes, I also created a low carb, healthier version of Moo Shu as well as a homemade low carb and sugar free hoisin sauce. All together, these pancakes, filled with flavorful Moo Shu stir fry and homemade hoisin, make a meal where you savor every bite.

Click here for the Moo Shu and homemade hoisin sauce recipe.

What are Mandarin Pancakes?

Mandarin pancakes, also known as Peking pancakes or Moo Shu wrappers, are thin and light pancakes with a chewy texture. In appearance they resemble crepes but are used to serve up a variety of Chinese dishes.

The traditional recipe uses flour, water, and toasted sesame oil. Our version requires our all-purpose bread mix, egg white, and oil. While there are a few more ingredients, it is still surprisingly quick and simple!

How to Make Low Carb Mandarin Pancakes

First Measure the Ingredients

For every 8 – 9 low carb pancakes you will need to weigh out 1.3 ounces of our All-Purpose Bread Mix.

You may use whatever oil you like, as long as it is a liquid oil.

Our recipe requires egg whites to give it strength while still keeping it light. 

Depending on your preference, you could substitute the water with a mild chicken broth. You could also add 1 tsp toasted sesame oil for some extra flavor

low carb mandarin pancake ingredients

Next, Mix all Ingredients Together Until Smooth

At Fox Hill Kitchens, we love using mason jars as they are convenient, dishwasher safe, and easy to store if you want to do the prep work ahead of time. Feel free to use a mixing bowl, or any other container to mix all the ingredients together.

Once there are no lumps or bumps, let the mixture rest for 5 minutes to allow it to thicken properly. This is a great time to prep your microwave platter. The easiest method to making your pancakes is to use a round silicone mat and an additional glass microwave platter or a very large flat plate. Put the mat on the plate or platter before pouring on the batter.

Finally, Pour & Cook Pancake Batter

Measure 1/4 cup of batter and pour onto a clean dry silicone mat on your microwave platter (you can successfully pour the batter directly onto the glass platter or plate, but it will take a little more effort and care to remove the cooked pancake). 

Pro tip: use a 1/3 sized measuring cup, fill it slightly less than full and just pour out the batter without needing to scrape out the cup each time.

Tilt the platter to spread the batter until you have approximately an 8-to-9-inch circle.

Microwave on high for 90 seconds and then check. If firm enough, peel off or loosen with a thin metal spatula. Flip the pancake over and check for any soft spots. If you find any areas not completely cooked, microwave for 30 more seconds. It is perfectly fine to just microwave for 2 min and reduce the need to check for doneness. It is important that your microwave is at least 1000 watts as the pancakes do not come out well with a weaker microwave.

Repeat the previous steps with the remaining batter.

When finished you will yield 8 – 9 pancakes.

Note: Microwave ovens vary in strength, you may need to increase the time to fully cook.

Fill your Low Carb Mandarin pancakes with Moo Shu and Enjoy!

This is the fun part. You can now fill your low carb Mandarin pancakes with delicious Moo Shu, our low-carb recipe can be found here!

And it doesn’t stop with Moo Shu! These pancakes can also be filled with many other dishes including red-braised pork, stir fry, and crispy Peking duck.

We had ours with low carb Moo Shu pork and our homemade low carb hoisin sauce.  Our version of this flavorful Chinese dish has only a few adjustments so it can fit into a low carb lifestyle.

low carb moo shu with low carb mandarin pancakes

Storage and Making Ahead of Time

Low carb Mandarin pancakes keep very well in the refrigerator so if you choose to make them ahead of time, just store them well wrapped. They will keep for up to a week in the refrigerator. 

They also freeze beautifully with no loss of quality and can be frozen for several weeks or longer if stored in a freezer quality bag. They will not stick together! This is very convenient for those who prefer to prep ahead.

Are microwaves safe? Link to article by Chris Kresser.
 

Tips for Success

  • Using a stick blender is definitely the best method. You can also mix by hand, but it will take longer, and it may be difficult to get all the lumps out.

 

  • The batter should be thin enough to spread by tipping the platter slowly in a circle until it is approx. 8-to-9-inch in diameter.

 

  • If the batter is too thick, you can add a Tbs of water at a time till its thin enough to spread without being completely runny.
 
  • Though not necessary, the silicone mat is highly recommended as it makes removing the pancake much easier. Here is a link to round mats on Amazon.

 

  • To make measuring and pouring quick and easy, we found using a 1/3 measuring cup and not quite filling it to the top, allows you to pour the correct amount onto the mat without needing to scrape out the measuring cup each time.

Recipe:

Low-Carb Mandarin Pancakes for Moo Shu

These delicious Mandarin pancakes are wonderfully light, yet strong, and pair perfectly with moo shu filling without falling apart. They are also gluten-free and low carb!
Prep Time5 mins
Active Time10 mins
Total Time15 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Chinese
Keyword: bread mix, gluten free, keto-friendly
Yield: 8 pancakes

Equipment

  • 1 Bowl or mason jar for mixing
  • Microwave
  • 1 Microwave platter and silicone mat (optional) for cooking

Materials

  • ¾ cup +2Tbs Egg whites approx. 6-8 large egg whites*
  • ¾ cup water **
  • 1.3 ounces by weight Fox Hill Kitchens All Purpose Bread Mix
  • ¼ cup oil avocado oil or other liquid oil
  • ½ tsp toasted sesame oil optional

Instructions

  • In the container of your choosing, mix all ingredients until completely smooth.
  • Let rest for 5 minutes to allow for thickening.
  • Pour 1/4 cup of batter on the silicone mat on your microwave platter (or directly on clean dry glass microwave platter or plate) and tilt around until you have approximately an 8-to-9-inch circle.
  • Place in microwave and cook on high for 2 min.***
  • If there are any soft areas and it is not completely set and firm enough to peel off, microwave for additional 30 seconds increments until fully set.****
  • Repeat with remaining batter.
  • Fill with Moo Shu and enjoy!

Notes

*Since egg size can vary greatly, this doesn't have to be strictly followed. If large eggs, you could use 6-8 egg whites, if extra-large, you may want to use 6.
**You can replace the water with a light broth for extra flavor.
***Cooking time may vary; especially powerful microwaves may fully cook the mandarin pancake in only 90 seconds.
****If the finished pancake doesn't release easily from the mat, you can try loosening it with a thin spatula.

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Mix all Ingredients Together Until Smooth

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